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Thursday, October 05, 2006

Microsoft .NET 3.0 Introduces The Digital Signing Framework of the Open Packaging Conventions

Microsoft .NET 3.0 Introduces The Digital Signing Framework of the Open Packaging Conventions

Applies to:
   OPC Digital Signing Framework
   W3C XML Digital Signature standard
   Microsoft .NET 3.0 Framework

Summary: Discusses the OPC Digital Signing Framework, providing an overview of the package components and supporting services, and examples of signing policy and its implementation. (12 printed pages)

Contents

Introduction
Components of the OPC Digital Signing Framework
   The XML Digital Signature Standard
   Representing Digital Signatures in Packages
   Signing Parts and Relationships
Programming Support for Package Signatures
   Signing Package Parts and Relationships
   Verifying Certificates and Signatures
Application Signing Policy
   XPS Documents
   Programming Support for XPS Signatures
References

Introduction

The packaging model specified by the Open Packaging Conventions (OPC) describes packages, parts, and relationships. Packages hold parts, which hold content and resources. Relationships are defined to connect the package to parts, and to connect various parts in the package.

This article discusses the OPC Digital Signing Framework, providing an overview of the package components and supporting services, and examples of signing policy and its implementation.

The Signing Framework includes an infrastructure for representing digital signatures, and the services for creating and validating signatures. The Signing Framework enables the W3C XML Digital Signature standard to be applied to package parts and relationships.

Using the Signing Framework, owners of package-based formats define and implement "signing policies" specific to their formats. The policies specify how to sign and validate the integral content of particular formats, and embody how signatures are used for different workflows. In fact, for a single format there may be several policies defined for use at different stages in the lifecycle of a document.

The signing policy for a package-based format is expressed in terms of signing parts and relationships, and possibly other document characteristics (such as validation of the intended display device, color-depth, or application version). A signing policy specifies which document components to sign and which to leave unsigned, if any. For example, a signing policy can be implemented to allow new parts and relationships to be added to a package, or a policy can cause a signature to be invalidated if new parts or signatures are added to a package.

This article assumes familiarity with the Open Packaging Conventions Specification and the W3C Recommendation XML-Signature Syntax and Processing.

Microsoft .NET 3.0 Introduces The Digital Signing Framework of the Open Packaging Conventions

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